May 14, 2019

Leapfrog Survey: Michigan Hospitals Ranked 11th

When it comes to hospital safety, you want to choose a hospital that will put your well-being at the forefront of their priorities. Preventable errors and infections are the third leading cause of death in the United States, and this is an unacceptable statistic. If you believe that you or a loved one are victims of preventable errors and infections in a hospital, it’s time to seek out the help of an experienced medical malpractice lawyer at Cochran, Kroll & Associates, P.C.

Preventable Errors

According to a study published by Johns Hopkins Medicine in 2016, over 250,000 people die annually from preventable medical errors. This figure is significantly higher than in any other developed country in the world. However, when it comes to reporting these errors, over 90% are never reported, and patients often have difficulties getting answers from their healthcare providers.

Preventable errors are caused by:

  • Errors, delays, or failures in diagnosis
  • Use of testing that is outmoded or incomplete
  • Failure to order or act on test results
  • Errors in treatments, surgery, medications, or testing
  • Delay in treatment
  • Birth injuries
  • Failure to monitor or follow-up with treatment
  • Failures in equipment or communication

Sometimes these errors are caused by a lack of education or training, sleep deprivation, negligence, and systemic failures within the healthcare system. With the underreporting and avoidance measures often taken by healthcare workers who realize they have made a mistake, it’s important to seek out a medical malpractice lawyer to get you the information you need for your preventable errors malpractice case.

Preventable Infections

Preventable infections occur when hospitals workers don’t take the proper precautions to keep antibiotic-resistant bacteria from entering a patient’s body. Those most susceptible to developing an infection often have catheters, central lines, ventilators, and surgical wounds. One in 25 patients develop preventable infections while in a hospital, and over 75,000 patients die from these infections every year.

Some of the healthcare-associated infections include:

  • Urinary tract infections
  • Pneumonia
  • Norovirus
  • Tuberculosis
  • MRSA
  • C. diff
  • Staph
  • HIV
  • Hepatitis
  • Influenza
  • Infections in central lines and surgical sites

If you believe you are the victim of a preventable infection, seek the advice of a medical attorney to help you build your case.

Leapfrog Annual Hospital Survey

In 2018, Michigan hospitals ranked 11th in hospital safety according to the Leapfrog Group. About 40% of the hospitals in Michigan, or 32 out of 81, received an “A” grade, which is based on “28 evidenced-based measures of patient safety.” While this is a notable improvement from the spring 2018 grades which ranked only 24 hospitals with an “A” grade, there is still a lot of work to do in terms of improving patient safety and preventing errors and infections.

Impact of Medical Negligence

When a doctor, nurse, or other healthcare worker does not take the proper steps to ensure accurate, timely, and appropriate care for their patients, the results can be disastrous. At worst, the patient can die from this negligence. The patient can also be severely injured or disabled, resulting in permanent disability and lost wages, along with significant pain and suffering.

At best, there may be some additional or unnecessary care costs as a result of medical negligence, and you may be entitled to compensation for those costs.

Michigan Patient Bill of Rights

The Michigan Patient Bill of Rights outlines the rights that each patient has under the state of Michigan’s healthcare facilities. You have the right to accurate, timely, and appropriate care under the supervision of a doctor or other healthcare worker. You should: Receive estimated costs of care in writing ahead of time; have the right to inquire about a doctor’s certifications; have the right to receive emergency care; have the right to refuse treatment and have the right to file a medical malpractice or wrongful death lawsuit against a healthcare provider.

Michigan Patient Bill of Rights

Proving Medical Malpractice

Medical malpractice can be difficult to prove in some cases. You have the right to request your medical records, and malpractice lawyers can help you investigate and build a case. They usually have a team of board-certified doctors and experts which they can call on to consult on your case and examine documentation, witness statements, and other evidence to determine if your case was caused by negligence.

If your case is not easy to prove, it might not be a viable lawsuit; however, you have up to two years in Michigan to file a medical malpractice claim from the time of the incident. This extra time may help with the investigation and provide more witnesses and clearer answers to help strengthen your case.

Hiring an Attorney

By hiring a medical malpractice lawyer and registered nurse Eileen Kroll at Cochran, Kroll & Associates, P.C. to take on your case, you are increasing your chances of winning your lawsuit. Not only will your lawyer collect evidence and expert testimony to bolster your case, but they will file all your paperwork on time and navigate the complex legal system for you.

For a no obligation consultation, please call 1-866-MICH LAW (1-866-642-4529).

Ms. Barry is studying Communications at the University of Pennsylvania. She has won multiple awards both for her persuasive and creative writing and has written extensively on the topics of medical malpractice law, personal and birth injury law, product liability law. When she’s not researching and writing about these topics, she edits a literary magazine and tutors students at Penn’s writing center.

CALL TOLL-FREE | 24 HOURS

RESULTS-DRIVEN TRACK RECORD

FREE CONSULTATION NO FEES UNTIL WE WIN

There is no obligation for a case evaluation & no fee is charged unless a recovery is made.
Your privacy is important to us. Cochran, Kroll & Associates, P.C. does not share, sell, rent, or trade personally identifiable or confidential information with third parties for any purpose.